Home   |  Staff   |  Local News   |  Area Events   |  Birthdays   |  Photos   |  Contact Us   |  Employment
 
Friday, May 19, 2017

Bear precautions
As the busy summer season approaches, Great Smoky Mountains National Park officials want to remind visitors about precautions they can take while enjoying the park to keep themselves and bears safe. Bears are particularly active this time of year in search for spring foods. Visitors should be prepared in how to safely observe bears without disturbing them during this critical season. “Bears are very active right now, and we’re receiving reports across the park of bear sightings along trails and roadways,” said Park Wildlife Biologist Bill Stiver. “We ask for the public’s help by respecting bears’ space.” Bears should be allowed to forage undisturbed on natural foods and should never be fed. Park officials remind visitors to properly store food and secure garbage. Coolers should always be properly stored in the trunk of a vehicle when not in use. All food waste should be properly disposed to discourage bears from approaching people. Hikers are reminded to take necessary precautions while in bear country including hiking in groups of 2 or more, carrying bear spray, complying with all backcountry closures, properly storing food regulations, and remaining at safe viewing distance from bears at all times. Feeding, touching, disturbing, or willfully approaching wildlife within 50 yards (150 feet), or any distance that disturbs or displaces wildlife, is illegal in the park. If approached by a bear, park officials recommend slowly backing away to put distance between yourself and the animal, creating space for it to pass. If the bear continues to approach, you should not run. Hikers should make themselves look large, stand their ground as a group, and throw rocks or sticks at the bear. If attacked by a black bear, rangers strongly recommend fighting back with any object available and remember that the bear may view you as prey. Though rare, attacks on humans do occur, causing injuries or death. For more information on what to do if you encounter a bear while hiking, please visit the park website at http://www.nps.gov/grsm/ naturescience/black-bears.htm. To report a bear incident in the park, please call 865-436-1230. Local residents are reminded to keep residential garbage secured and to remove any other attractants such as bird feeders and pet foods from their yards. To report a bear incident outside of the park, please call Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency at 1-800-831-1174.


Return to Today's News Stories - Front Page

Monday, May 21, 2018

  • Rolling Thunder to stop off in Cocke County
  • Cocke Fire
  • Paramedics attacked
  • Lawson arrest in shooting
  • Trump to visit Nashville
  • Expensive gas for Memorial holiday

    Saturday, May 19, 2018

  • Tiny Homes purchases former Ace Products site
  • Qualifying is underway for Newport and Parrottsville posts
  • Do not disturb young wildlife
  • Farm Bill defeated
  • TBI investigating Greene County officer involved shooting
  • Walters State is tech-savvy
  • Friday fuel leak

    Friday, May 18, 2018

  • Partnership update
  • Fancher is candidate for Newport mayor
  • Missing Retreivers
  • Corley arrest
  • Safe Boating Awareness

    Thursday, May 17, 2018

  • SNAP could be cut to pay for tax cuts
  • Marijuana sentencing
  • Candidates for governor poll
  • Bredesen /Blackburn poll
  • Tennessee sues Oxycontin maker
  • In lieu of tax payments

    Wednesday, May 16, 2018

  • Trouten pleads to arson
  • Phone wire cut in Del Rio
  • Cocke County School Board meets
  • Cocke County Jail assaults
  • Buckner injury
  • Burger search
  •    

    Home  |  Staff  |  Photos  |  Local News  |  Contact Us  |  Employment

    © 2007 92.3 WNPC - Bristol Broadcasting Company, Inc.
    All Rights Reserved