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Wednesday, August 09, 2017

Factory workers to retire
Twenty-five percent of factory workers in Tennessee will retire in the next ten years and manufacturers are concerned about getting enough qualified workers for the future because of increasingly technology-based factories. That is a concern despite the fact that an average manufacturing wage in the state is $66,000. Manufacturers surveyed by the Tennessee Manufacturers Association say workforce challenges are their biggest concern, more than concerns over regulations, taxes and roads. Denise Rice, director of the Tennessee Manufacturers Association (TMA) says factory operators are generally optimistic about Tennessee's economy but increasingly worried about filling jobs as the labor market tightens and skill demand increases. "The one thing that I hear that is consistent everywhere is the concern over the skills gap and the challenge of getting a qualified workforce. I think this problem is at an all-time high and this is not a short-term problem. We're going to be looking at workforce problems for the next five to 10 years at least as Baby Boomers retire from manufacturing and our state continues to grow its manufacturing output,"she says. As the most experienced workers are leaving the labor market, the skill demands for manufacturing will become greater, requiring certifications or advanced training for most jobs. After decades of decline, manufacturing employment has risen fairly steadily over the past seven years as the economy has regained its footing and Tennessee has attracted record levels of direct foreign investment back into the United States. According to IBM Global Location Trends, Tennessee has led the nation in two of the last three years, in foreign direct investment, much of it in manufacturing. The pace of that growth will be tempered, however, by automation and technology that boosts labor productivity and limits the amount of labor required to produce more goods.


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Saturday, September 23, 2017

  • Identity theft or fraud
  • Tennessee Promise is helping students
  • Marijuana hearing
  • Sevier County scam

    Friday, September 22, 2017

  • Job prospects continue to look positive for Cocke County
  • More Pasternak defendants are sentenced
  • Person of interest identified
  • Jobless rate in Tennessee continues to drop
  • Bear season opens on Saturday
  • Water service to be affected

    Thursday, September 21, 2017

  • Trial delayed after only half of prospective jurors show
  • Judge Davidson on monitors
  • Potts is being sought
  • THP wants to locate witnesses
  • New Republican health plan
  • Hurricane losses may hike premiums for us all.

    Wednesday, September 20, 2017

  • Pasternak steroid conspiracy
  • Lt. Lawson on medical leave
  • Charles.....the Survivor
  • Proposed ACA modification falls apart
  • Be aware of flood vehicles

    Tuesday, September 19, 2017

  • Welfare to work
  • Presnell sentenced
  • Fentanyl leads to death
  • CLB talks jail issues
  • Hurricane insurance losses
  • Tuck identified as Park fatality
  •    

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